Resources Library

Browse on-demand resources and strategies designed to help your clients improve retirement with home equity.

CLIENT OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT

Nine simple questions to help you and your client evaluate if a reverse mortgage may be right for them.

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WEBINAR

Advanced Retirement Planning with Home Equity

July 18, 2024 | 2:00PM EST

Usage Cases
GOAL
Pay for grandchildren’s college expenses.
BACKGROUND

Name: Charlene K.

Age: 72

Home Value: $650,000

Potential Loan Amount: $278,000

SOLUTION

A reverse mortgage line of credit withdrawing $35,000 per year for 10 years* while retaining home equity.

GOAL
To have income tax-free retirement funds.
BACKGROUND

Name: Martin S.

Age: 62

Home Value: $800,000

Potential Loan Amount: $296,000

Retirement Savings: $1,300,000

SOLUTION

A reverse mortgage line of credit on his home to pay the taxes on his Roth conversions, allowing for tax-free growth* and distributions for the rest of his life. His heirs will inherit the Roth income tax-free as well.

GOAL
To maximize Social Security benefits.
BACKGROUND

Name: Sarah S.

Age: 66

Home Value: $525,000

Potential Loan Amount: $191,200

SOLUTION

A reverse mortgage line-of-credit to supplement her cash flow, allowing her to delay taking Social Security and maximize the benefit.

Stay up to date

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FOA’s Resch on the evolution of reverse mortgage…

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Home equity is traditionally used for such familiar costs as home repair, education and debt consolidation, but…
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Here’s when a reverse mortgage makes sense, expert…

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Seniors are facing serious economic headwinds these days. Inflation is up, interest rates are high, and to make matters…
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What are the potential home equity and tax strateg…

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Some seniors could employ home equity through a reverse mortgage to pay taxes.
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Awareness of reverse mortgage utility could be imp…

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Data from WSFS Mortgage suggests that most seniors understand the ways a reverse mortgage could help them…
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FOA narrows losses, touts dominance of reverse mor…

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We are firmly positioned as the leading provider of modern retirement solutions with the potential to reach…
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The reverse mortgage seeks a home with affluent in…

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It’s no longer just a last-resort income option. When used strategically, the reverse mortgage can be part…
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Are reverse mortgages the most underutilized retir…

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It’s all about the sequence-of-returns risk; spending from the home equity loan helps your client preserve more…
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Sieffert Building a United Company Culture at FOA …

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We are taking a heavy look at what we can do differently from a technology and customer…
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Are Your Clients Overlooking Their Best Asset?…

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While 401(k)s and homes aren’t commonly thought of as parallel investments, they do share multiple functional characteristics.
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Kristen Sieffert talks about her career path and T…

Video
FAR is helping the modern retiree reimage what their retirement could look like through the power of…
Watch

Financial Advisors Guide to Reverse Mortgages…

Guide
As one of your clients’ most trusted resources, you play an essential role in providing clear direction…
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FAR’s CMO on reverse mortgage industry headwinds…

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It becomes important to focus on what the companies can control…that includes borrower outreach efforts and methodologies…
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Rhode Island Historian Uses a Reverse Mortgage as …

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We are thrilled that our HomeSafe product enabled these estate planning goals and generous philanthropic gift.
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Frequently Asked Questions

Yes. The borrower still retains ownership of the home and may sell it at any time with no prepayment penalties. The home is simply secured with a lien similar to a traditional mortgage or home equity line of credit.

There is never a required principal or interest payment during the life of a reverse mortgage loan. Homeowners are still required to pay property-related expenses, including taxes, insurance, and HOA fees.

Generally, the loan balance is due after the last borrower permanently moves from the home or passes away.

The borrower’s heirs may sell the home and keep any remaining equity if they wish, or refinance with a traditional mortgage if they want to retain the property. In the event the loan exceeds the value of the property, the heirs can choose to walk away via foreclosure with no responsibility to the remaining balance.

Yes, reverse mortgages are non-recourse loans, which means the lender can only look to the subject property for satisfaction of the mortgage lien. The borrower and/or heirs are never personally liable for satisfaction of the reverse mortgage.

FAR’s proprietary products can offer borrowers loan amounts up to $4 million.

Yes. The home can be in a trust, revocable or irrevocable, provided the trust meets FHA trust guidelines.

This amount is generally based on the home’s value, prevailing interest rates, and the age of the youngest borrower or eligible non-borrowing spouse.

Reverse mortgages are only available on the borrower’s primary residence, which can be a single-family home or up to a four-unit dwelling.

However, there are no restrictions on the use of reverse mortgage proceeds. As long as borrowers continue to meet the occupancy requirements of the loan, they may use their proceeds as part of a secondary property purchase.

The borrower is responsible for all property-related expenses, including taxes, insurance, and HOA fees.

No. All reverse mortgage proceeds are considered loan proceeds and not subject to income tax.

Borrowers must be at least 62 for an FHA-insured reverse mortgage and 60 (where applicable by state law) for a lender-specific product, including FAR’s proprietary solutions. Younger spouses can remain on the property title but cannot be on the loan.

The terms of the loan remain the same as long as one borrower remains in the home.